ITALY – Whereas nearby Milan is know for fashion and finance, its neighbour to the east, Turin (IT: Torino), is known as a hard-working industrial city. It is most notably the home of car manufacturer Fiat, and one of the most important economic centers of the country. But it is also much more than that, as I found out on a short visit to this pleasant northern-Italian city of about 900,000.

A typical 19th century neighbourhood to the north of the centre:

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Mole Antonelliana, which was built as a synagogue between 1863 and 1889 and is the symbol of Turin (it now houses the National Museum of Cinema)

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The view from Mole Antonelliana:

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7. A backstreet near the central palace

The back of the palace:

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10. One of Turin’s many old squares

11. Piazza Castello

12. And one of Turin’s many arcaded streets

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14. Piazza Vittorio Veneto

15. The river Po

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17. View from Borgo Crimea, the neighbourhood on the hillsides on the opposite bank of the Po

18. Looking back towards Piazza Vittorio Veneto

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Villa della Regina (‘Villa of the Queen’), which was built for the house of Savoy (a regional royal family )in the 17th century:

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25. Turin seen from Villa della Regina. On a clearer day, the Alps would be visible in the background

26. The Basilica of Superga seen from Villa della Regina

Lastly, a few pictures of Aurora, the popular quarter on the northern edge of the center where my hostel was located:

27. The central market on Porta Palazzo

28. Corso Giulio Cesare

Leaving Turin the next day:

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31. Dora station, from where I took the train to the airport

This entry was posted in Italy, Metropolitan City of Turin, Piedmont

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